The geek on Massachusetts HIE

This was sent to me by a physician colleague in San Francisco. I really the Geek Doctor blog. I learn a lot by browsing his posts. I hope you find it useful. >

> A great overview of MA HIE priorities from Dr Halamka. Although this > is a state view, I think it gives good ideas for both state and > local HIEs. >
> http://geekdoctor.blogspot.com/2010/06/massachusetts-ad-hoc-hie-workgroup.html

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3 thoughts on “The geek on Massachusetts HIE

  1. Michael Clarage March 3, 2011 / 8:25 pm

    My partner and I head two hospitalists groups in the Boston area, one acute care, the other a rehab hospital. For years our handoff communications went through paper mail or fax. We were very diligent about communication. Even so, specialist from acute care settings and primary care physicians in the community complained that our group was like a black box – that they were not getting good communication about the care we were providing. The hospital even setup a physician portal so that any on-staff doctor could log in remotely and access their patient’s information. But this “pull” model never caught on, as most doctors expect data to be “pushed” out to them.

    One of our new physicians suggested we look at Concentrica, http://www.concentrica.com , which is an online network for secure clinical communication. This is free to physicians to communicate with each other. The national directory of physicians meant that we could quickly send to any physician, without having to know their fax or email. Like an online email system, recipients can reply and forward messages, so now we could get immediate feedback from colleagues in other locations, and in important cases, have a real dialog about patient care. The “Group Discussions” feature allows the specialist in town, the hospitalist, and the PCP to all join in an online dialog about one patient.

    The application works well on our smartphones.

    When our group wanted to send documents on our behalf, we upgraded to the subscription version, which cost less than paying someone in our office to fax the documents. There is an audit trail so we can see who received their messages. One feature we really liked was that if the message was not accessed online it was faxed, so we knew our clinical work was getting there.

    For our group it made it easy to communicate with other physicians, to get our documents out, gave a way for others to respond, and was cost effective.

    Arthur Williams, MD

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